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Here is some helpful information about acne treatment.

WASHINGTON, Aug 19 (Reuters) - A device that tackles acne by using light to destroy the bacteria that causes it has won approval from U.S. regulators, the company that makes the product said on Monday.

Israeli medical device maker Lumenis Ltd. (LUME) said the Food and Drug Administration approved the product, called the Clear Light Acne Photo Clearing System, for a type of acne known as moderate inflammatory acne.

The device employs a blue, high-intensity light, shined on the area to be treated, to kill the bacteria that is the primary cause of acne. Each treatment takes about 15 minutes and is painless, the company said. A typical course of treatment consists of eight visits over a period of four weeks.

Macrene Alexiades-Armenakas, a New York city dermatologist, said the Clear Light system will offer an alternative to antibiotics, which can have side effects, or to topical treatments that must be applied three times a day.

"It is a real positive option for people who don't want to take antibiotics and who either don't have the time or for various reasons do not want to comply with complex topical regimens needed to clear acne," she said.

Also, about 40 percent of acne bacteria is resistant to antibiotics, said Alon Maor, executive vice president of Lumenis' aesthetic division.

Maor estimated that about 11 million U.S. teenagers would be candidates for the light therapy. He said the price will vary across the country but he expects each treatment will cost between $50 and $100.

Maor said there are no known side effects, and patients can return to normal activities immediately after each treatment. The most common areas for treatment are the face, neck, chest and back, although the system may be used on other areas.

More than 30 percent of all dermatologist visits are for acne-related causes, and in the United States, more than $1.4 billion is spent on anti-acne medications and treatments, Lumenis said in a statement. REUTERS

2002 Reuters

UPDATE 1-Lumenis says US FDA approves acne device August 19, 2002 9:12:00 PM ET

By Lisa Richwine

WASHINGTON, Aug 19 (Reuters) - A device that tackles acne by using light to destroy the bacteria that causes it has won approval from U.S. regulators, the company that makes the product said on Monday.

Israeli medical device maker Lumenis Ltd. (LUME) said the Food and Drug Administration approved the product, called the ClearLight Acne PhotoClearing System, for a type of acne known as moderate inflammatory acne.

The device employs a blue, high-intensity light, shined on the area to be treated, to kill the bacteria that is the primary cause of acne. Each treatment takes about 15 minutes and is painless, the company said. A typical course of treatment consists of eight visits over a period of four weeks.

Macrene Alexiades-Armenakas, a New York city dermatologist, said the ClearLight system will offer an alternative to antibiotics, which can have side effects, or to topical treatments that must be applied three times a day.

"It is a real positive option for people who don't want to take antibiotics and who either don't have the time or for various reasons do not want to comply with complex topical regimens needed to clear acne," she said.

Also, about 40 percent of acne bacteria is resistant to antibiotics, said Alon Maor, executive vice president of Lumenis' aesthetic division.

Maor estimated that about 11 million U.S. teenagers would be candidates for the light therapy. He said the price will vary across the country but he expects each treatment will cost between $50 and $100.

Maor said there are no known side effects, and patients can return to normal activities immediately after each treatment. The most common areas for treatment are the face, neck, chest and back, although the system may be used on other areas.

More than 30 percent of all dermatologist visits are for acne-related causes, and in the United States, more than $1.4 billion is spent on anti-acne medications and treatments, Lumenis said in a statement. REUTERS